Adopting the Investor’s Mind

Jay TuroOver at the GrowThink Blog, Jay Turo writes that founders need to adopt both the Entrepreneur’s Mind and Investor’s Mind.

For Entrepreneurs, just for a few moments, step in the space of not believing one’s own propaganda. This too, is hard as what makes entrepreneurs who they are is their unshakeable and often irrational self-belief, in spite of often much evidence to the contrary. This self-belief serves them well as leaders and as creators, but as shareholders not so much. And as shareholders, the irrefutable principles of diversification, of long-term and global planning, and of the overriding importance of small differences in return, multiplied over time, so fundamentally apply.

Read the Full Story.

How Optensity Helps Analysts Make Sense of Big Data

Over at CNN Money, By JP Mangalindan writes that while many organizations continue to struggle to make sense of Big Data, a new Startup called Optensity has built a system that assists decision-making without worrying about where the data is located, how it’s formatted, and how it’s changing.

One thing popping up is called the “Internet of Things,” said Optensity Founder and CEO Pamela Arya. “That’s an example where we think our tool could be really useful in the future. Because the Internet of Things is basically a world of sensors, where you would compute on the sensor as the data is throwing off the sensor to find out interesting things. Hey, nobody’s been in the house for a while, but the air conditioner is still running. That kind of thing. So you needs two sensors there: a physical sensor. No one’s moving around. Another sensor saying the air conditioning’s running. So those kinds of problems are where we see the future of where data is going.”

Next week, Optensity will compete at this year’s Startup Idol competition during Fortune’s Brainstorm Tech conference in Colorado. Read the Full Story.

Why Quirky Names for so many Startups?

Startup names

Over at the Wall Street Journal, Lindsay Gellman writes that Startups are increasingly adopting quirky names. Short, memorable URLs are mostly spoken for, so founders go for made-up words that are more easily trademarked.

The challenge is to come up with something that conveys meaning, is memorable,—and isn’t just alphabet soup. Most founders don’t have the budget to hire naming advisers. Founders tend to favor short names of five to seven letters, because they worry that potential customers might forget longer ones, according to Steve Manning, founder of Igor, a name-consulting company. Linguistically speaking, there are only a few methods of forming new words. They include misspelling, compounding, blending and scrambling.

Read the Full Story.

Paul Graham

Paul Graham from Y Combinator writes that Entrepreneurs need to to do things that don’t scale. The founder has to make it happen.

The question to ask about an early stage startup is not “is this company taking over the world?” but “how big could this company get if the founders did the right things?” And the right things often seem both laborious and inconsequential at the time. Microsoft can’t have seemed very impressive when it was just a couple guys in Albuquerque writing Basic interpreters for a market of a few thousand hobbyists (as they were then called), but in retrospect that was the optimal path to dominating microcomputer software. And I know Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia didn’t feel like they were en route to the big time as they were taking “professional” photos of their first hosts’ apartments. They were just trying to survive. But in retrospect that too was the optimal path to dominating a big market.

Read the Full Story.