Slidecast: Unreasonable at Sea – An Experiment in Transnational Entrepreneurship

In this podcast, Luke Jones from Semester at Sea presents: Unreasonable at Sea – An Experiment in Transnational Entrepreneurship.

Unreasonable at Sea is a radical experiment in global entrepreneurship, design-thinking, and education, designed to scale-up effective technological solutions to the greatest challenges of our time. We do this by hedging our bets on the most thrifty, resourceful, creative, and disruptive class amongst us: entrepreneurs. We are a mentor-driven accelerator for tech-entrepreneurs who desire to take their ventures into new international markets, and we choose to work exclusively with companies working on “intractable” social and environmental challenges. We could think of no better way to accelerate our portfolio companies’ ability to scale across borders than to put them all on one ship, align them with some of the world’s greatest mentors, and set sail more than 25,000 nautical miles while visiting 13 countries over the course of 100 days.”

Download the MP3Subscribe on iTunes * If Dropbox is blocked, download audio from Google Drive.

Crafting a Disruptive Business Model

Matthew E. May writes about how to craft a disruptive business model:

The word “disruptive” is bandied about when referring to surprising new entrants into an industry, new players with new technology, and sudden competition coming from unlikely sources. But once you have the as-is Business Model Canvas completed, there are two things you can do to mitigate the element of surprise when it comes to your business model being disrupted, in addition to keeping a constant vigil on the external social, economic and market forces out of your control that can potentially disrupt your business.

Start-Up Entrepreneurs – Get Ready For An Emotional Ride!

We may tend to think of Startup Entreprenuers as icy-cold, lazer-focused characters like the Mark Zuckerberg depicted in The Social Network. The truth is that Startups can be an emotional ride, which blogger Karen Waksman writes about in a new post.

The truth is that Entrepreneurs are getting bombarded with big emotional decisions on a consistent basis. They have to determine how to spend their time, money and effort in an efficient and effective way in order to develop their businesses. Additionally, statistics show that on average it usually takes at least a year for a small business owner to actually generate a profit from their business. Talk about a pressure!!

I think Waksman is on to something here. When launching this new publication, I had to ask myself, “How do I prepare myself for a job where I’ll never be done?” Read the Full Story.

5 Tips from a Serial Entrepreneur

Serial entrepreneur Farid Naib has posted five lessons learned along the way:

All businesses face the same types of issues and problems. Every day, I ask myself the same questions: How do I adapt to a changing marketplace? How do I get my message out and reach potential customers? How do I turn first-time clients into happy, returning clients? Practical, firsthand experience from those who have already been through it is definitely the best kind. Use your network. Talk to people who have been doing it a long time and be willing to consider that you may be wrong.

Read the Full Story.