Interview: Grant Cardone on the 10x Rule of Success

In this video, Grant Cardone discusses the principles of Sales Success in his book entitled: The 10x Rule.

The 10X Rule unveils the principle of “Massive Action,” allowing you to blast through business cliches and risk-aversion while taking concrete steps to reach your dreams. It also demonstrates why people get stuck in the first three actions and how to move into making the 10X Rule a discipline. Find out exactly where to start, what to do, and how to follow up each action you take with more action to achieve 10x the money, 10x your goals, 10x the happiness, and 10x your possibilities with Grant’s latest book, The 10X Rule.”

Video: Why Startups Need to Solve Real Problems

In this video, Alexis Madrigal from The Atlantic presents: The Jig is Up – Why Startups Need To Solve Real Problems.

Alexis Madrigal thinks our modern entrepreneurial climate has a problem: we’re not solving big problems anymore. The startup boom in the late 90s gave birth to revolutionary mobile devices. Now, the best we can do is Facebook. Madrigal offers two solutions: stop the pervasiveness of “free” web apps and increase the diversity among founding teams. Fresh perspectives, he argues, will bring a new paradigm for startups — and for creativity in general.

5 Ways Entrepreneurs Can Control Technology

Vanessa Merit Nornberg at Inc. Magazine lists 5 Tech Rules Entrepreneurs Should Live By:

Work-related texts and Tweets should be quick, but right. In business, it is important not only to be fast thinking, but also to be able to fully develop ideas. Pertinent questions must be asked and clear paths charted in order to problem-solve and grow. Today’s technology users have yet to strike a balance between rapidity and complex communications. A customer expecting instant feedback does not want to get a half-baked answer. They want to be answered quickly, but also correctly. Business partners expecting to be answered at midnight are still in need of impactful solutions rather than impulsive ones. I try to separate my tools into categories. Emails are for fully developed ideas, texts are for quick practical information, and the phone is still my best tool when I need to get a deal done.

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Complete Guide to Getting Press for Your Startup

breaking-newsAngel Investor Leo Widrich has posted an excellent guide on how to get media coverage for your Startup.

Everything mentioned in this guide, should set you up for making it easy to get into this cycle of constant coverage and news mentions. Of course, the development of your startup needs to clearly follow that path. Given that you have launched with a true MVP in Lean Startup fashion, and are iterating like a madman, you shouldn’t run into any troubles to come up with a new story ever two to three weeks. If you do, work with your team and push yourself to release more stuff, more frequently.

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Why Premature Hype Kills Startups

Tara Hunt over at Inc. writes that premature hype can really kill a Startup.

The biggest issue with pushing the press buttons before you are ready for it is that the world should not be your beta lab. Robert Scoble, in a widely read rant against writing about minimum viable products, wrote: “If you’re gonna pitch me something it better provide magic.” Every company wants to get to traction and getting to traction requires spreading the word, but if the word spread is “that app sucks,” it will damage your reputation far more than waiting a few months until you can show something magical.

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Three Keys to Startup Success

 

Paul Graham

Paul Graham

Paul Graham has posted one of his talks from Harvard that focuses on the three things you need to be a successful startup: the idea, people, and what customers want.

Google understands a few other things most Web companies still don’t. The most important is that you should put users before advertisers, even though the advertisers are paying and users aren’t. One of my favorite bumper stickers reads “if the people lead, the leaders will follow.” Paraphrased for the Web, this becomes “get all the users, and the advertisers will follow.” More generally, design your product to please users first, and then think about how to make money from it. If you don’t put users first, you leave a gap for competitors who do.

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Choose Influential Customers First

Roy Bahat

Roy Bahat

Over at the Also Blog, Roy Boyhat from Bloomberg Beta writes that Startups need to pick their first customers based on their gradient of influence.

One way to think of it: your first customers are your first hires as marketers. You want them to be as good at their job as possible. Imagine all your customers as you did before (in terms of how valuable they’ll find you, and how easy they’ll be to attract). Then, consider that some of them have influence on others. You’ll find pockets where one kind of customer influences another, and some customer classes who are widely influential, or influential to several important adjacent customer classes. Think of this as a gradient of influence among your customers.

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Worst Startup Headlines of the Year

Clara Byrne shares some of the worst press release headlines she’s seen this year at VentureBeat.

In the interest of public service, here are some of the worst press release and pitch email titles of 2011 and our notes on how to avoid making next year’s list. Names have been changed to protect the guilty.

The winner has to be this one:

Startup X’s Scalable, Modular System Combines Shared-Nothing MPP Relational Database with Enterprise-Class Apache Hadoop for Structured and Unstructured Data Co-processing

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