Crafting a Disruptive Business Model

Matthew E. May writes about how to craft a disruptive business model:

The word “disruptive” is bandied about when referring to surprising new entrants into an industry, new players with new technology, and sudden competition coming from unlikely sources. But once you have the as-is Business Model Canvas completed, there are two things you can do to mitigate the element of surprise when it comes to your business model being disrupted, in addition to keeping a constant vigil on the external social, economic and market forces out of your control that can potentially disrupt your business.

Start-Up Entrepreneurs – Get Ready For An Emotional Ride!

We may tend to think of Startup Entreprenuers as icy-cold, lazer-focused characters like the Mark Zuckerberg depicted in The Social Network. The truth is that Startups can be an emotional ride, which blogger Karen Waksman writes about in a new post.

The truth is that Entrepreneurs are getting bombarded with big emotional decisions on a consistent basis. They have to determine how to spend their time, money and effort in an efficient and effective way in order to develop their businesses. Additionally, statistics show that on average it usually takes at least a year for a small business owner to actually generate a profit from their business. Talk about a pressure!!

I think Waksman is on to something here. When launching this new publication, I had to ask myself, “How do I prepare myself for a job where I’ll never be done?” Read the Full Story.

5 Tips from a Serial Entrepreneur

Serial entrepreneur Farid Naib has posted five lessons learned along the way:

All businesses face the same types of issues and problems. Every day, I ask myself the same questions: How do I adapt to a changing marketplace? How do I get my message out and reach potential customers? How do I turn first-time clients into happy, returning clients? Practical, firsthand experience from those who have already been through it is definitely the best kind. Use your network. Talk to people who have been doing it a long time and be willing to consider that you may be wrong.

Read the Full Story.

I JUST FIGURED OUT HOW TO FIX EVERYTHING!

I had a revelation today while trying to buy healthcare. I’m telling you, this idea is a huge opportunity for the right Startup to partner with one of the world’s biggest companies!

Background

Here in Oregon, one needs to use the state’s Cover Oregon web site to sign up for Obamacare. The only problem is, the site does not work.

Having tried myself, I can tell you that it is currently is impossible to get Obamacare through the Cover Oregon web site. I applied a month ago and have heard nothing. Why? Their application is nothing but a PDF form that someone prints somewhere so they can key your data into Oracle!

According to this article in the Oregonian, who is to blame for this debacle? Oracle!

Now it all makes sense.

 
I tried to call Cover Oregon and see what the deal is. After two hours on hold, I never even got through.

I ended up purchasing insurance directly at moda.com. They know how to do business and have a web site that works.

So I’m asking myself, why do we need to apply in the first place? We are required by law to buy insurance.

And then it hit me.

The IRS needs to adopt Obamacare’s business model and hire Oracle to do the web site! You’ll have to apply to pay your taxes.

We will all be much richer in the end.

Hardest Lessons from Startup School

Paul GrahamPaul Graham from Y Combinator has posted lessons some of the Hardest Lessons from Startup School.

Improving constantly is an instance of a more general rule: make users happy. One thing all startups have in common is that they can’t force anyone to do anything. They can’t force anyone to use their software, and they can’t force anyone to do deals with them. A startup has to sing for its supper. That’s why the successful ones make great things. They have to, or die.

Read the Full Story.